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Diagnosis: Types of Tumors

Benign Epithelial Tumors
  • Cystadenoma - unilocular or multilocular cystic neoplasm composed predominantly of benign epithelial elements with minimal intervening fibrous tissue; epithelium is simple, nonstratified and cytologically benign.

  • Cystadenofibroma - unilocular or multilocular cystic neoplasm composed of benign epithelial elements with a prominent fibrous tissue component; epithelium is simple, nonstratified and cytologically benign.

  • Adenofibroma - solid neoplasm composed of benign epithelial elements within a fibrous stroma; epithelium is simple, nonstratified and cytologically benign.

  • Serous cystadenomas and fibromas - These tumors are common, accounting for about 25% of all benign ovarian neoplasms and 58% of all ovarian serous tumors. The peak incidence is in the fourth and fifth decades. The symptoms and signs are nonspecific and most commonly include pelvic pain, discomfort, or an asymptomatic pelvic mass discovered on routine examination. Between 12-23% of cystadenomas are involve both ovaries. Since serous cystadenomas are benign, unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy or ovarian cystectomy is adequate treatment. Recurrence is extremely rare and reflects either incomplete resection or a new primary tumor.

  • Benign mucinous tumors - Mucinous cystadenomas and adenofibromas comprise 50% of all benign ovarian epithelial neoplasms, and 80% of ovarian mucinous neoplasms. Benign mucinous neoplasms occur most often in the third to sixth decades with a mean age of about 50 years. Small tumors are often found incidentally whereas large tumors present as an obvious pelvic or abdominal mass. Bilaterality is uncommon, occurring in 2-5% of cases.

  • Endometrioid adenofibromas - Endometrioid adenofibromas are uncommon and are usually unilateral. The median age of women with these tumors is 57 years. Occasional endometrioid adenofibromas are associated with endometriosis. These tumors are benign, although rarely may recur.

  • Clear cell adenofibromas - Among approximately 12 reported cases of benign clear cell tumors, the mean age is 45 years. One case was bilateral. The clinical behavior is benign.

  
     
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